Tag Archive: The Guardian


m & m

Morrissey and Marr – pre severed alliance

In a recent interview with Krishman Guru-Murthy, Johnny Marr publicly distances himself from Morrissey’s more outspoken statements that have been widely interpreted as endorsements of racism and far right bigotry.

Wisely in my view, Marr has resisted the temptation to go any further by joining in the rising tide of venom towards his ex-Smiths partner.

To understand what he’s opting out of, you only have to read the scurrilous one star review of Morrissey’s latest covers album ‘California Sun’ in The Guardian. This makes it plain that there are now many who are no longer able the separate the man from the music.

The mood of zero tolerance was also evident when a lone complaint by a commuter in Liverpool led to posters for ‘California Sun’ being removed from the entire rail network.

I would be the first to concede that Morrissey has brought much of this unprecedented backlash upon himself. Publicly lending his support to ‘For Britain’ was for many the last straw. Prior to this, his comments against Halal meat and China’s abysmal record on animal rights could at least be defended on the grounds that they reflected his radical veganism. Now he seems to have bitten off more than he can chew.

Morrissey has a history of exaggerating for effect and knows that moderation doesn’t generate the required level of publicity. This is a man who likens animal slaughter to murder and once sang about a dream of Margaret Thatcher being guillotined.

Like all narcissistic populists, Morrissey works on the basis that there’s no such thing as bad publicity. But these days, different rule books seem to apply to the worlds of politics and entertainment. The likes of Trump, Farage and Johnson revel in the controversies they provoke and gain support from a public who distrust those who take the moral high ground. Continue reading

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Maggie Thatcher and Hilary MantelThe best kind of  killer is one who can hide in plain sight  and  is able to pass unnoticed in a crowd.

Hilary Mantel does not look like an assassin. On the contrary, she seems so prim and proper.  I’m sure she often gets mistaken for a Tory.  She is always well turned out, wears pastel shades and her hairstyle is not so dissimilar to Thatcher’s.

This is what makes her short story The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher – August 6th 1983,( published in The Guardian) seem so out of character.

It has caused a minor storm in a tea-cup among those who still misguided enough to argue that Thatcher saved, rather than ruined,  the nation. To those who merrily sang Ding Dong The Witch Is Dead las year, Mantel is an unlikely heroine. Continue reading

pressTwo articles in The Guardian caught my eye today.

The first in a series called ‘first thoughts’ on the topic of the train and coach crashes in Spain and Italy that have claimed over a hundred lives.

If journalism has any function, it should offer fresh insights or offer new perspectives on tragic events like these. Continue reading

Journalist of the year

Gary Younge

My vote for journalist of the year would go to the Guardian’s New York correspondant Gary Younge. (He also contributes to The Notion blog in The Nation).

His column in The Guardian Weekly are always the first thing I seek out and he is able to write about complex political and moral questions without being simplistic or bombastic.

His perspective as a Black Briton gives him a unique insight into racial issues which are so central to American politics. It also enables him to identify with the sense of being an outsider and to write about the culturally ‘dispossesed’ with compassion and understanding.

Gary talks about his new book ‘Stranger In A Strange Land- Encounters In The Disunited States’ on NPR.

Archives of his pieces are well worth checking out.

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