Category: Humour


NO LAUGHING MATTER by Anthony Cronin (First published by Grafton Books, 1989)

984085There are certain novels, like Robert Musil’s ‘The Man Without Qualities’, that I find too daunting to even attempt and others, such as Malcolm Lowry’s ‘Under The Volcano’ that I have tried but failed to complete.

‘At Swim-Two-Birds’ by Flann O’Brien was, until this year, gathering dust in my unfinished pile. I have Anthony Cronin’s candid and informative biography of O’Brien to thank for finally completing this short, comic but notoriously challenging novel.

Cronin skillfully puts the work into a literary and historical context while bluntly presenting the man behind it as a sad character. Continue reading

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Less by Andrew Sean Greer (First published in the USA by Lee Boudreaux Books 2017)

lessAs a picaresque, comic novel this, at first glance, appears to be an unlikely winner of the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Yet, although there are moments of high farce, there is a serious message behind the humour.

It is the bitter-sweet tale of Arthur Less, who is about to turn 50 and is described as “an author too old to be fresh and too young to be rediscovered”. He is far from being a failure but a long way from being the success he once dreamed of. He is a single gay man whose most significant of numerous relationships was with a Pulitzer prize-winning poet who is now gravely ill.

Aside from this, Less has recently ended a relationship with a younger man on such amicable terms that he has been invited to his ex’s wedding. Anxious to avoid this, he devises a plan. Continue reading

THE DISASTER ARTIST directed by James Franco (USA, 2017)

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Forget about Grinding Nemo and Gary ‘Winston’ Oldman, the Oscar statuettes this year should have gone to ‘The Disaster Artist’ and James Franco respectively.

Of course, neither were even in contention due to the serious allegations of sexual impropriety hanging over Franco but that doesn’t change the fact that this is a brilliant and hilarious movie.

Franco’s full-blooded star turn as failed actor and wannabe movie star Tommy Wiseau is compelling from start to finish. I can’t remember the last time I laughed so much in the cinema. Continue reading

erwitt forliToday I visited the exhibition of Elliot Erwitt photographs at the San Dominico gallery in Forlì, Italy.

Many of the American photographer’s pictures were familiar although he is not a household name (at least not in my household).

The exhibition presents black and white + later color photos covering Erwitt’s long career – he is now 89 and still working.

Although the presentation of these images was haphazard and the audio commentary irritatingly superficial, it was well worth seeing.

Although Erwitt photographed many prominent figures, notably Marilyn Monroe, Che Guevara and John F. Kennedy it is his eye for the absurdities of everyday life that are most memorable with dogs being a frequent subject.

One of my favorite images was taken at Prado Museum in Madrid in 1995 . This shows that Francesco Goya’s reclining nude of Maja is a big hit with male gazers while the clothed image of the same woman fully clothed has a lone female viewer.

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Who wants to watch an entire film about veganism? Well, I do but I am already converted to the cause so I don’t really count.

Comedian Simon Amstell is aware that preaching to the choir isn’t going to change hearts, minds and eating habits. His savvy BBC film is therefore aimed at the not so silent majority who still cling to the outdated notion that being a vegan is unachievable, extremist and faintly ridiculous. Continue reading

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